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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
View from Mustang over the village of Muktinath and the Annapurna Himal with its peaks ranging higher than 8000m a.s.l.
This photo blog takes you on a journey to the hidden beauty of the Lo's people former kingdom: The Mustang region in Nepal. The photos were taken on a 21-day-trek through rocky, dusty valleys. We crossed ice cold rivers barefoot, drank water from foul-smelling springs and climbed up to 5416m - running on a Dal Bhat diet only (lentils with rice, the Nepalease national dish). It was a great experience! Thank's to my compagnons Katharina Auersperg, Wonchhu Sherpa and Laxman Rai.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
Situated between Tibet and India, Mustang was once a transit region for salt caravans that did a brisk business in bartering. A good livelihood for the rural population.


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November 2017
Jomsom, Mustang, Nepal
Jomsom, the starting point for treks to Mustang, can be reached by bus or plane. From here on the only means of transportation are jeeps and off-road trucks. Due to massive road construction, this region will soon be easily accessible.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
Before sunset a herd of goats is being driven through the narrow streets of Kagbeni into the stable. The restricted area Mustang begins just north of here.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
Two horseback riders cross the river bed of the Kali Gandaki. Recently built micro-hydro power plants provide the region with relatively expensive electricity. Thus the utilization varies considerably, depending on social class and lifestyle.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
According to myth, Padmasambhava, the founder of Tibetan Buddhism, eviscerated a demoness, whose blood coloured the cliffs red. Centuries-old caves are used for religious rites.


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November 2017
30.11.2013
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
In traditional architectural style, the Nyphu Gompa monastery was constructed of stone, mud-brick, and wood. The typically painted façade melds the architecture with the rock formation.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
Yaks are the most versatile and productive animals in the Himalayas. Their meat, milk, fur, and skins are all processed. High in the mountains even their dung is used as fuel – often there is no alternative source.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
Surrounded by a red wall, Lo Manthang, the capital of the former Kingdom of Lo, is today a part of Mustang. South of the town rises the Annapurna Massif.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal
Chortens (Buddhist shrines) line the path through Tangge in Mustang. The little village lies at the foot of a breath-taking rock plateau, far from the main road.


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November 2017
Mustang, Nepal